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  • 10/31/2019

    Click the link below to be directed to this year’s sports wagering educational video for officials.  The video is approximately 20 minutes in length and includes sports wagering information with which you should be familiar. 

    2019 NCAA Integrity Education Video

     

    Best regards,

    Dan Calandro
    NCAA, Director of Championships and Alliances

     

  • 10/24/2019


    Click here to first watch video clip 1 and video clip 2.

    Rule: 9.12 - Players must not obstruct an opponent who is attempting to play the ball.

    Players obstruct if they:

    1.  Back into an opponent

    2.  Physically interfere with the stick or body of an opponent

    3. Shield the ball from a legitimate tackle with their stick or any part of their body

    Application: In both videos, the defender is called for the body contact on the attacker thus a PC/ Free hit awarded to the attack. With the wonders of video, it can be seen that the attackers attempt to receive the ball on their right side and in the process extend their hips out in the direction of the defender preventing the defender from coming around to play the ball. Thus, depending on the timing, a very real possibility to be obstruction against the attacker.

    Guidance: READ THE PLAY! Anticipate the challenge and be prepared to look at all aspects of it. Many times the defense is penalized with a card or intentional foul because of the contact, when from these angles it appears that the attacker created the contact by extending their hips out to shield the defender from playing the ball. Do not stand still and look for this…move with the play to give yourself the best depth perception possible to make the appropriate decision.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 10/23/2019


    Click here to first watch video clip 1 and video clip 2.

    Rule: 9.12 - Players must not obstruct an opponent who is attempting to play the ball.

    Players obstruct if they:

    1.  Back into an opponent

    2.  Physically interfere with the stick or body of an opponent

    3. Shield the ball from a legitimate tackle with their stick or any part of their body

    A player who runs in front of or blocks an opponent to stop them legitimately playing or attempting to play the ball is obstructing (this is third party or shadow obstruction). This also applies if an attacker runs across or blocks defenders (including the goalkeeper) when a penalty corner is being taken.

    Application: In both videos, an attack player comes in from about a 45-degree angle in order to attract the attention of the defense on a PC. In video PC1, from this angle, it is very possible that the white player interfered with the defender as she attempts to play the ball, thus possible obstruction. In video PC2 an attacker comes in on about the same 45-degree angle and without attempting to play the ball, steps in the path of the defender as the ball is passed behind her back to the inserter, thus possibly preventing the defender from playing the ball. Both situations are very difficult for the lead umpire to handle alone. Many teams attempt this type of play on a PC which is perfectly legal until the obstruction possibility.

    Guidance: First and foremost…talk about how this type of play will be handled in your pre-game talk! It is very difficult for the lead umpire to watch where the ball goes after the contact and decide if advantage should be played or the play called immediately. Your communication on this over the radios is key. In PC2 the umpires communicated on the play and the goal was disallowed which showed good teamwork. This situation can always be argued for or against obstruction, but umpires must be aware of this play and be prepared to administer a decision as necessary.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 10/22/2019


    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule: 9.13  - Players must not tackle unless in a position to play the ball without body contact.

    Reckless play, such as sliding tackles and other overly physical challenges by field players, which take an opponent to ground and which have the potential to cause injury should attract appropriate match and personal penalties.

    Application: The white defending player runs toward the attacker with the ball and attempts to tackle without any regard for her body and momentum. She attempts an upright tackle which then knocks the attacker to the ground. The lead umpire properly plays advantage in which a penalty corner is eventually awarded for a different foul. The umpires immediately stop time and communicate with each other that the white defender will be receiving a card for the physical tackle…Well Done Application

    Guidance: This type of tackle has been more prominent this year than in past years. This type of tackle is a breakdown tackle and needs to be recognized even if the play continues with advantage. This is why we have one umpire watch the play with the ball and the other umpire watching off ball for the extra physical plays that can happen. Keep in contact with your partner on the radio and chat about how you will manage such situations in your pre-game talk.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 10/22/2019


    Rule:  13.7.d  - The player taking the stroke must stand behind and within playing distance of the ball before beginning the stroke.

    Rule:  13.7.e  - The player defending the stroke must stand with both feet on the goal-line and, once the whistle has been blown to start the penalty stroke, must not leave the goal-line or move either foot until the ball has been played

    Application: Both feet must be behind the ball at the start of the penalty stroke. One foot behind does not constitute being behind the ball. GK must have both feet on the line.

    Guidance: This rule has been in place for many years. It is not up to the umpire to correct this before the stroke is taken. This is a violation of the rule and if the stroke goes in, it should be negated, and a free hit given to the defense. On the same premise, if the GK is not in proper position and the shot is saved it should be retaken.

  • 10/7/2019


    Shootout Position Clarification: When a shootout occurs and there is no reserve official for the match, the position of the umpires should be as follows:

    1.  The lead umpire takes up a position similar to the position if the one on one would happen in a game, out to the proper side between the Penalty Stroke mark and the top of the circle.

    2.  The second umpire is to be on the end line 5 -10 meters from the near post on the side opposite of the lead umpire. "i.e. where you would stand for a Penalty Stroke"

    Lead Umpire: Makes all decisions for the shootout. Moves accordingly with the play to obtain the best angles possible. May obtain advise from the second umpire if necessary.

    Second Umpire: May assist if asked for help by the lead umpire but is primarily responsible for seeing if the ball crosses the goal line before or after the time has elapsed.

    Only when there are three umpires assigned to a match will the second umpire take up a position opposite of the lead umpire between the penalty stroke mark and top of the circle. The third umpire then would take the position on the end line and the only responsibility is to see if the ball crosses the goal line before or after time has elapsed.

  • 10/4/2019

     

    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule: 7.4 When the ball is played over the back-line and no goal is scored:

    a. If played by an attacker, play is re-started with the ball up to 16 yards from and in line with where it crossed the back-line and the procedures for taking a free hit apply.

    Application:  Ball goes over the end line off an attack stick thus a 16-yard hit out is called properly. The ensuing hit is placed 2-3 yards outside the circle and the now white team is using a high press by placing a player right on the dotted circle line. Therefore, the white defender is not 5m away from where the free hit is being taken. The umpire indicates 5 yards then after the hit is taken, cards the white player. Incorrect Application.

    Guidance: Play is re-started with the ball up to 16 yards from and in line with where it crossed the back-line. If the defending team (white) on this free hit has chosen to back away and are beyond the 25-yard line, then if the restart begins at about 1-2 yards outside the circle, ok. BUT, if a team is playing a high press and sets the block-up at the dotted line, they are not violating the rule. The responsibility to take the free hit from the right spot is on the attack team (blue). The umpires should manage this quickly before any confusion can take place. The defense cannot be expected to back away more than 5 yards from the spot of the free hit, which in this case is up to the top of the circle and no further.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 10/3/2019

     

    NCAA Officials:

    This document was developed as part of the NCAA’s continued review of its risk management program.  Please note that this document summarizes information that may render an official ineligible to officiate any rounds of any of the NCAA championships.    

    Also, please note that one or more of the components of the “Notifications and Determinations” section may not be in place until the 2020-21 academic year. 

    Best regards,

    Dan Calandro
    NCAA, Director of Championships and Alliances
     

  • 9/30/2019

     

    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule: 13.1.b A free hit awarded to the defense within 15 meters of the back-line is taken up to 15 meters from the back- line in line with the location of the offence, parallel to the side-line

    A free hit to the defense awarded in the circle may be taken anywhere in the circle.

    Application: A foul was called by the umpire near the end line against the attack. As the team moved the ball up, they got off with “in line” of where the foul occurred. The umpire made the team retake the free hit. This is an improper application as the 2019 Rules of Hockey.

    Guidance: Be aware the free hit was a foul and not a ball over the end line. Teams can now move the ball anywhere in the circle to take the ensuing free hit.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/23/2019


    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule:  9.13 Players must not tackle unless in a position to play the ball without body contact.

    Reckless play, such as sliding tackles and other overly physical challenges by field players, which take an opponent to ground and which have the potential to cause injury should attract appropriate match and personal penalties.

    Application:  The umpire called this as a simple foul and a free hit to the white team. This type of play is happening more and more and should be eliminated this is why the rule on slide tackling is in place and applies to both the defenders and attacker. In this instance, the player in white could have been injured.  The player in the dark uniform came in and had no regard for safety toward the player in white.  This should have been carded in some fashion no matter what point of the game this happened.

    Guidance:  The position of the umpire trailing the play is not optimal. This has happened to every umpire at one time or another. Look to read the game quicker and make the adjustment to be closer to the play. The initial call for the free hit out appears to be correct, no issues. It is important to note that if this was a defender sliding like this into an attacker, the expectation would be a yellow card for a physical foul. The same must apply consistently to an attacker sliding in the same such way on a defender.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/19/2019

     

    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule:  9.13 Players must not tackle unless in a position to play the ball without body contact.

    Reckless play, such as sliding tackles and other overly physical challenges by field players, which take an opponent to ground and which have the potential to cause injury should attract appropriate match and personal penalties.

    Application: This was a no call situation during the game. This decision is in an area where both umpires could have managed it. This type of play is happening more and more and should be eliminated, very similar to the rules on slide tackling. The player in the dark uniform came in and had no regard for safety toward the player in white.  This should have been carded in some fashion no matter what point of the game this happened.

    Guidance: At the moment of impact, there appears to be 3 players between the trail umpire and the play. Look to move wide to get out of a position of possibly being blocked out. The move in by the umpire initially is ok but be prepared to adjust when the play develops like this… Not sure of the angle of the other umpire, but a sight line should be found to see this as the ball is coming in that direction. Even though this is in that “gray area” of the umpire’s coverage area, be strong, don’t just leave it for your partner and recognize the impact this type of play has on the game. Both umpires can call this. Since this is a physical play in which a player “could” have been injured, a 10-minute yellow would not be out of line.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/18/2019

    Please click the link to view Radio Usage for Umpires.

  • 9/18/2019


    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule:  9.8 Players must not play the ball dangerously or in a way which leads to dangerous play. A ball is also considered dangerous when it causes legitimate evasive action by opponents.

    Application:  This was deemed dangerous and a free hit given to the defense. It can be seen that the defender is marking the attacker(#1) when the shot is taken, not with the intent of protecting the goal like a goalkeeper. The defender was playing proper defense on the attacker(#1) and had to take legitimate evasive action from the shot. Thus, the proper application would be a free hit to the defense as called by the umpire.

    Guidance:  This can be a tough situation recognize when the shot is taken. Look at the big picture. Was the defender “squared up” to act like a GK? Are other attackers trying to also play the ball or look for a tip? It appears the shot is on goal and would have gone in if not stopped. Some may initially look at this as a PC or a PS but, the defender was properly marking an attacker and not attempting to defend in a way to protect the goal. The attack does not have the right to shoot through a defender playing legitimate defense. Again, not an easy decision in many instances.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/16/2019

     

    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Positioning:          

    a.  Umpires must be mobile so they can move to appropriate positions throughout the match.b.  Static umpires cannot view play clearly enough to make correct decisions at all times

    c.  Fit, mobile and well positioned umpires are better able to concentrate on the flow of the match and on the decisions which need to be made

    d.  Each umpire operates mainly in half of the field with the center line to their left

    e.  In general, the most suitable position for umpires is ahead of and on the right of the attacking team

    f.  For play between the centerline and 23 meters area, umpires must be positioned near their side-line

    g.  When play is in the 23 meters area or circle, umpires must move further into the field away from the side- lines and, when necessary, into the circle itself to see important offences and to judge whether shots at goal are legitimate

    h.  For penalty corners and after the ball has gone outside the field, umpires must take up a position which gives a clear view of all potential action

    i.  For penalty strokes, umpires must take up a position behind and to the right of the player taking the stroke

    j.  Umpires must not allow their positioning to interfere with the flow of play

    k.  Umpires must face the players all the time.

    Application:  The umpire is in a good position as she crosses the 23-meter line. The ball and the play are on about a 45-degree angle as she is ahead of the play. The umpire slows down as the play slows which now forces her to go wide when the ball swings toward her. This puts her in a position to have to make a critical decision of whether the ball wholly crossed the goal line or not from the edge of the circle.

    Guidance:  Keep moving ahead of the play with every attempt to get into the circle and hotspot (near post area) well before the ball crosses the 23-meter line.  This will allow for the play to come toward you and not away from you. This decision would have been accepted much better had the umpire been much closer to the play. Be well ahead of the play so that the play cannot force you to go wide.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/12/2019


    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule: 13.2  When a free hit is awarded to the attack within the 23 meters area, all players other than the player taking the free hit must be at least 5 meters from the ball,

    If an opponent is within 5 meters of the ball, they must not interfere with the taking of the free hit or must not play or attempt to play the ball.

    Any playing of the ball, attempting to play the ball or interference by a defender or an attacker who was not 5 meters from the ball, should be penalized accordingly.

    Application: A personal penalty (green card) was issued without a penalty corner. It was deemed that the interference from behind did not prevent a goal scoring opportunity. Thus, a personal penalty and not a team penalty. The player tackling from behind was not 5 meters away at the start of the free hit, therefore she is required to allow the ball to move a minimum of 5 meters before engaging. Had she not interfered and influenced the play, the dark team had a very good chance to get the ball into the circle. This tackle from behind should be considered a breakdown / intentional foul from behind. Therefore, the proper application would have been a penalty corner for the tackle then the addition of the personal penalty.

    Guidance: Be aware of the position of defenders and attackers when the free hit is inside the 23-meter line. Any influence by attackers or defenders who were not 5 meters from the start of the free hit should be penalized. When attempts to tackle from behind are made unsuccessfully causing a stick interference, the defender is not in a proper tackling position and should be penalized as intentional knowing if unsuccessful, they will slow down the attacker. An intentional foul by the defense inside the 23-meter line is a penalty corner. (Rule 12.3)

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/9/2019


    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule:  9.11 Field players must not stop, kick, propel, pick up, throw or carry the ball with any part of their body.

    Application: This was deemed dangerous and a free hit given to the defense. At a closer look, it can be seen that the defender turned to the attacker taking the shot, with the intent of protecting the goal like a goalkeeper, thus putting herself in a dangerous position from an otherwise legal shot at goal. With the goalkeeper nearby, this may not have prevented a sure goal which would have been a penalty stroke, but the defender allowed for her body to be used to defend a legal shot, thus a penalty corner would have been appropriate…Improper application of the Rule.

    Guidance: This can be a tough situation to call a penalty corner against a player who may be injured, but she unfortunately placed herself in that position. It appears the shot is on goal and would have gone in if not stopped. If the shot was going well high or wide and not on goal, a defense hit out would have be appropriate.  The defender was not marking an attacker or attempting to defend in any other way but to protect the goal. Had the defender been playing legitimate defense on an opponent, the attack would not have the right to shoot through her.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/6/2019

     

    Hello NCAA Umpires,

    It has come to our attention that some umpires who have an interest in umpiring the NCAA Tournaments may have not obtained the information necessary to qualify for the post season. Since this is the first year of this process we are looking to accommodate as many hockey umpires as possible. Therefore, we are looking to reach those who have not already signed up for the “Hockey Corner."

    We are very excited to announce that the NCAA, ArbiterSports and USA Field Hockey have worked together to develop and launch the NCAA Field Hockey Officiating website “Hockey Corner”. Hockey Corner is designed to be the premier site for collegiate field hockey umpire information.

    Inside Hockey Corner, you will find all rules, clarifications, guidance documents, and informational links necessary to keep you current in your umpiring knowledge. In addition, briefings, videos, rule applications, quizzes and the annual rules test will be available. Even if you are not available or interested in umpiring the NCAA post season, the “Hockey Corner” will be the place for all communications and information throughout the year.

    In order to be eligible to Umpire the NCAA Post Season Championships, you MUST take and pass the 2019 Rules Test on the Hockey Corner by September 23, 2019. The passing grade is 87%. Those who have only taken it once may do so again if necessary.

    As Hockey Corner is an ongoing informational site, there will be frequent changes and updates to the information throughout the year, not just during the season.

    In order to be eligible for postseason assignment to the NCAA Divisions I, II or III Field Hockey Championships, you will be required to register and be active with Hockey Corner. Registration is currently OPEN, and the registration fee for officials is $50. You may register by clicking the REGISTRATION tab.

    Best wishes for a great season!

    Steve Horgan
    NCAA National Coordinator of Field Hockey Officials
    NCAA Field Hockey Rules Interpreter

     

  • 9/6/2019

     

    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule: 13.6  For an offence during the taking of a penalty corner:

    e. an attacker enters the circle before permitted, the player taking the push or hit from the backline is required to go beyond the center- line : the penalty corner is taken again

    Application: The umpire does not look over the shoulder to see the player coming in from her left. If a defender had broken the line after the whistle, the umpire would have been expected to send the defender beyond the center line. Thus, in fairness to the game the inserter should have been required to go to the center line per this rule change for 2019…Improper Application of the Rule.

    Guidance: Umpires should take a moment and look over their shoulder to know where all players are on a PC. This situation should be discussed in the umpire’s pre-game talk. This can be managed in a number of ways, but it must be managed properly. With radios, communication on this issue is very important,

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 9/4/2019


    Click here to first watch the video clip.

    Rule: 13.3.l if the first shot at goal is a hit (as opposed to a push, flick or scoop), the ball must cross the goal-line, or be on a path which would have resulted in it crossing the goal-line, at a height of not more than 460 mm (the height of the backboard) before any deflection, for a goal to be scored.

    Application: The umpire deemed the hit from the top of the circle to be a pass as it appears to be well wide of the goal and the attacker coming in from the right side attempted to play the ball but overran it. Subsequently the turnaround hit on goal was the first shot and must cross the goal line below board height to be legal…Proper Application of the Rule.

    Guidance: The hit from the top of the circle DOES NOT have to be going between the posts to be considered a shot. In this case, the umpire appears to be in a good position to judge this properly and read the play. Umpires should make a decision and show a signal before stopping time to chat with partner to discuss the situation.

    Video clips and photos are being utilized for educational purposes only and not meant to critique individual players, coaches or officials.

  • 8/30/2019

    Please click the link under the VIDEOS Tab to view 2019 Annual Rules Briefing.

  • 5/15/2019

    Welcome to the 2019 Hockey Season and the New NCAA Field Hockey Central Hub! 

    We all are excited to be poised and ready to have this opportunity to inform and educate everyone within NCAA Field Hockey community.  We look to be the support for umpires, coaches and players to enhance the knowledge of the game while promoting the advancement of the game and the experience of the student athletes.

    We will use ArbiterSports and the NCAA Field Hockey Central Hub to communicate important hockey information as it becomes available.  Please visit the “Hockey Corner” Central Hub frequently to stay current on the latest Field Hockey Officiating news and information.

    On the central hub, you will be able to read the latest rules applications from the Rules Interpreter and bulletins from the National Coordinator, complete your requirements to be considered for a postseason assignment, take yearly test, take periodic rules quizzes, and review videos clips on correct application of the rules and mechanics of officiating.

    To register, click the Registration Tab at the top of the page.

    The 2019 NCAA Field Hockey Rules Exam is available on the Testing Tab.  Rules and clarifications are available by clicking on the Rules Tab.

    The ArbiterMobile app is available at no cost to NCAA registered officials. To download the app, please complete this season's officials' registration, and then download it from Google Play or iTunes.  Click here to read ArbiterMobile FAQs.

    I am very pleased  you have chosen to register with the NCAA.  Thank you for being a critical part of the NCAA Field Hockey Program.  If you have ideas or suggestions for improvement, please email me at shorgan@usafieldhockey.com.

    Best wishes for a great season!

    Steve Horgan
    Coordinator of Officials for Field Hockey
    Sports Rules Interpreter

  • 5/8/2019

     

    Hello NCAA Umpires,

    We are very excited to announce that the NCAA, ArbiterSports and USA Field Hockey have worked together to develop and launch the NCAA Field Hockey Officiating website “Hockey Corner." Hockey Corner is designed to be the premier site for collegiate field hockey umpire information.

    Inside Hockey Corner, you will find all rules, clarifications, guidance documents, and informational links necessary to keep you current in your umpiring knowledge. In addition, briefings, videos, rule applications, quizzes, and the annual rules test will be available.

    As Hockey Corner is an ongoing informational site, there will be frequent changes and updates to the information throughout the year, not just during the season.

    In order to be eligible for postseason assignment to the NCAA Divisions I, II or III Field Hockey Championships, you will be required to register and be active with Hockey Corner. Registration opens May 15, and the registration fee for officials is $50. Beginning May 15, you may register by clicking the REGISTRATION tab.

    Best wishes for a great season!

    Steve Horgan
    NCAA National Coordinator of Field Hockey Officials
    NCAA Field Hockey Rules Interpreter

 
 
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